Archive for the ‘Division Page: EXPLORE’ Category

Watch This!

Through the years, M&G has developed topical videos to support the educational themes of our diverse exhibitions and outreaches.  Enjoy learning about the people of the past through these varied glimpses.

The Continuing Victorian Narrative: Inspiring Character
The Continuing Victorian Narrative: Theatre of the Mind
The Continuing Victorian Narrative: Caroline Norton & Angela Burdett-Coutts
The Continuing Victorian Narrative: Women
The Continuing Victorian Narrative: Conan Doyle & Henry Irving
The Continuing Victorian Narrative: Gentlemen
Symbols in Religious Art: Representations of Deity
Symbols in Religious Art: Earthly Saints and Heavenly Spirits
Symbols in Religious Art: Attributes of the Martyrs
Symbols in Religious Art: Prominent Bible Characters
Symbols in Religious Art: The Four Apostles
The Life of Martin Luther
Conservation
The Charleston Silver Lady
Frederic James Shields: The Pre-Raphaelites
Why We Collect
Ten Most Forged Artists
Han van Meegeren: part 1
Han van Meegeren: part 2
Han van Meegeren: part 3
Lost Art: The Cassirer Family
Lost Art: The Bendel Family
Lost Art: The Bloch-Bauer Family
Landmark Case of Nazi-Looted Art: The Discovery
Landmark Case of Nazi-Looted Art: Authentication
Landmark Case of Nazi-Looted Art: Verdict
The High Renaissance: Raphael
The High Renaissance: Leonardo da Vinci
The High Renaissance: Michelangelo
Mannerism: An Introduction
Mannerism: Characteristics
Mannerism: Conclusion
Baroque Art: Introduction
Baroque Art: Prominent Schools
Baroque Art: Stylistic Scope
Baroque Art: Conclusion

A Closer Look

Take a closer look at objects in the collection to discover fascinating details in the materials, narrative, or artists. Each clip will help you better understand the past as well as enjoy the objects in M&G’s collection.

Madonna and Child: Master of the Greenville Tondo
John the Baptist: Polychromed Sculpture
Gaspar de Crayer: St. Augustine & St. Ambrose
Edwin Long: Vashti Refuses the King’s Summons
Louis Comfort Tiffany: Inspiration
Govaert Flinck: Solomon’s Prayer for Wisdom
Simon Vouet: Salome with the Head of John the Baptist
Francesco Granacci: Rest on the Flight into Egypt
Alessandro di Mariano Filipepi, called Sandro Botticelli (and studio): Madonna and Child with an Angel
Jusepe de Ribera: Ecce Homo
Gustave Doré: Christ Leaving the Praetorium
Girolamo Della Robbia: Terracotta Busts
Mattia Preti: Christ Seats the Child in the Midst of the Disciples
Peter Paul Rubens: Christ on the Cross
Cassone: Renaissance Marriage Chest
Francesco de Rosa: The Martyrdom of St. Lawrence
Guido Reni: The Four Evangelists
Geritt van Honthorst: The Holy Family in the Carpenter Shop
Francois de Troy: Christ and the Samaritan Woman
Francesco Cavazzoni: Legend of the Finding of the True Cross
Giovanni Filippo Criscuolo (attr. to): The Last Judgment
Stefano Cernotto (attr. to): The Last Supper
Salvator Rosa: Landscape with the Baptism of Christ
Domenico Zampieri: St. John the Evangelist
Jaun de Flandes: St. Augustine and St.Roch
Jan Hermansz. van Bijlert: Mary Magdalene Turning from the World to Christ
Anthony van Dyck: Mother of Sorrows (Mater Dolorosa)
Jan Swart: Nativity Triptych
Jan Gossaert: The Madonna of the Fireplace
Northern Mannerism: The Martyrdom of Peter
Marietta Robusti: Allegory of Wisdom
Philippe de Champaigne: The Christ of Derision
The Easter Story: Two Centurions
Antonio del Castillo y Saavedra: St. John the Baptist in the Wilderness

History in Pictures

Art is a record of ideas and messages from the past by reflecting its own time and culture. Sometimes art’s culture is foreign to our own experiences and understanding today, which requires a translation in order for us to grasp the meaning of its intent and the significance in its time. Listen and learn about works of art and their context from M&G’s collection and others—it’s an opportunity to view the world beyond your twenty-first-century perspective and experience.

 

Head of Christ, Rembrandt Harmensz. van Rijn (school of)
Louis XVI Musical Mantel Clock
Portrait of Charles the Bold, Peter Paul Rubens (follower of)
The Visit of the Queen of Sheba to Solomon, Jacopo Robusti, called Il Tintoretto
Two Angels with Banner, Unknown English 19th Century
Domenico Zampieri, called Il Domenichino
Anthony van Dyck
Bartolomé Esteban Murillo
Louis Comfort Tiffany
Isaiah’s Lips Anointed with Fire: Benjamin West, P.R.A.
Carlo Francesco Nuvolone
Carlo Dolci
Imperial Red Cross Easter Egg
Russian icon
Edwin Long, R. A.
Hezekiah Tapestry
Master of the Borghese Tondo
Julius Weitzner
Bone Casket
Rutilio di Lorenzo Manetti
Richard Houston (engraver)
Salvator Rosa
Pietro Novelli
Johann Friedrich Overbeck
Benjamin West, P. R. A.
Albrecht Dürer
Gaspar de Crayer
Lucas Cranach, the Younger
Frans Francken, the Younger
Visiting Museums
Eyre Crowe
Gustave Doré
Niccolò di Pietro Gerini
Gilbert Stuart
Edward Matthew Ward

Object of the Month: April 2021

The Entombment of Christ

Oil on canvas

Jusepe de Ribera, called Lo Spagnoletto

Spanish, 1591-1652

While Italian Renaissance artists benefited from a mutual sharing of progressive artistic advancements, Spanish artists remained deeply provincial until the Baroque age. Jusepe de Ribera spent his career in the Spanish-controlled kingdom of Naples where he adopted the naturalism of Caravaggio. Ribera’s works, imported from Naples to Spain, brought to other Spanish artists the lighting effects of Caravaggio, the most influential Italian painter of the 17th century. In addition, viceroys brought both originals by Caravaggio and copies back to Spain. Caravaggio’s dramatically deep chiaroscuro (the effect of light and shade) and rugged realism (portraying as accurately as possible the natural world) are evident in this work by Ribera.

When looking at religious art, it is best to begin with the source of the work. In this case it is the Biblical accounts of the burial of Christ which are detailed in all four of the Gospels and reveal the cast of characters present in the painting (Matthew 27, Mark 15, Luke 23, and John 19). After His sacrificial death on the cross, Christ was hastily buried because of the imminent start of the Sabbath celebration. Joseph of Arimathea, a just man who had voted against the action of the Sanhedrin to put Christ to death; Nicodemus, another member of the Sanhedrin who had sought out Jesus by night to inquire how one could enter the kingdom of heaven; and Mary Magdalene, a wealthy follower of Christ who had seven devils cast out of her, are all mentioned as being present at the tomb. Other women are mentioned as well, but John the disciple and Mary, Christ’s mother are not mentioned in the Gospels as attending, but Ribera chooses to adhere to tradition and include them both.

Traditional Imagery

So, who is who? Traditional iconography would dictate that John is the young man in the back right who is wiping away his tears. Joseph would be the older man in the forefront with the red cloak; he is, after all, a wealthy man who has donated his new tomb for the Savior. That leaves Nicodemus as the older man at the head of Christ. Because of the long, free blonde hair, Mary Magdalene is in the center with Mary the mother of Christ in the shadows.

Though Christ’s body is pallid and remarkably whole given the scourging and the crowning of His head with thorns, the open wound in His side signifies Christ’s personal cost for man’s salvation from sin, which He purchased for all. Bringing forth blood and water, the soldier’s action revealed the emptying of life that sustained Christ until the payment of man’s sin was complete. Ribera places the body on a stone surface, likely the burial table in the tomb, which has a sharply defined corner. This compositional detail reflects the words of the Apostle Peter, referencing the Psalmist David and the prophet Isaiah who characterize the coming Messiah as a “rejected” stone of “stumbling and a rock of offense” which has become the “cornerstone.” A cornerstone sets the stability of the entire building, and the reader is told that “whoever believes in him will not be put to shame” (I Peter 2:6-8). Clearly, the kingdom of God is set upon the foundation of the death of Jesus Christ.

Ironically, however, at His death and burial, no one believed He would rise again. The incredulity of the disciples when the women reported the angel’s words at the empty tomb reveals that they did not understand the teaching of Jesus that He “must suffer many things and be rejected by the elders and chief priests and scribes, and be killed, and on the third day be raised” (Luke 9:21). But anyone who does understand that saying, including the multitude of Christ’s followers in the days following the resurrection, can be assured that he or she will not be disappointed in believing and accepting the death of the sinless Christ to pay for their own sins.

What is interesting about Ribera’s composition of the Entombment is the placement of the two women. Mary the mother of Christ is no longer the prominent woman; she is nearly hidden in the shadows while Mary Magdalene is in the foreground mourning Christ with clasped hands and downcast eyes.

Scriptural Accounts

Given the controversies associated with the Magdalene, it is important to focus on what the Scriptures tell about her:

  • Luke tells that “some women who had been healed of evil spirits and infirmities” followed Christ as He traveled. The first listed is “Mary, called Magdalene, from whom seven demons had gone out” (8:2). These women are also characterized as supporting Christ and His disciples “out of their means” (Luke 8:3).
  • At the crucifixion, John reports that Mary was “standing by the cross of Jesus” with Mary the mother of Christ (19:25).
  • Mark then relates that “Mary Magdalene and Mary the mother of Jesus saw where [Jesus] was laid” (15:47) and with “the women who had come with him from Galilee . . . returned and prepared spices and ointments” (Luke 23:55-56) for the more detailed burial after the Sabbath was over.
  • All four Gospels reveal that Mary Magdalene was up early on the morning after the Sabbath on her way to the tomb to minister to the Lord’s body. Here, clearly, is the biblical record of a woman dedicated to the life and memory of the One who had rescued her from Satan’s power.

Artistic Depiction

Ribera’s reversal of prominence may reflect the truth that at Christ’s death, His relationship to His mother ended. As the eldest son, now unable to care for His mother any longer, He transferred Mary to John’s care. But the prominence of Mary Magdalene in the central foreground of the group of followers mirrors the tender truth of a Luke 7 parable told by Jesus about a moneylender who forgave a large and small debt of two men as an illustration about another woman only identified as “a sinner” (likely a woman of loose morals). Although Magdalene is not this woman, her life attests to the same love that the “sinner” had for her Lord. Christ explains that the unnamed woman is like the man with the greater debt. Her “sins, which are many, are forgiven—for she loved much. But he who is forgiven little, loves little.” The Magdalene had not one, but seven, devils cast out of her; there is no telling the damaging physical effects of her demon-possession. And though the demons were aware of Christ’s identity as the Messiah, they certainly would have kept their victim from realizing and accepting that truth for herself. The Magdalene of Ribera’s focus had much to be thankful for, and her dedication to the service of both the living and dead Christ reveals the depth of that love.

At the tomb early that Easter morning, Mary Magdalene and her companions were told that Christ was risen and instructed to tell the disciples. What a privilege to share that good news! But Mary was more than a messenger. Christ appeared to hundreds of His disciples in the days after His resurrection, but Mark relates, “Now when He rose early on the first day of the week, He appeared first to Mary Magdalene, from whom He had cast out seven demons” (16:9). Given her love for Christ as evidenced by her eagerness to prepare His body properly for burial, it is no accident that she is the first to see the risen Christ whom she worships immediately, clasping His nail-pierced feet—the physical manifestation of Christ’s power to defeat death, her demons, and save her eternal soul.

Ribera’s composition places the viewer within the circle of mourners around the dead Christ with nothing in the composition to separate the viewer from the body itself. Thus, we are made to react as if we were within the frame. Do we see ourselves as sinners, loving Christ dearly, but devasted at His death, demoralized by the apparent emptiness of His promises of the kingdom of God and the forgiveness of sins?  Will we, like Mary Magdalene, recognize our Savior and hear Him say that He is “ascending to my Father and your Father, to my God and your God” (John 20:17)? We will, if this Easter, we believe the Gospel accounts of the Christ whom Mary followed faithfully.

Karen Rowe Jones, M&G board member

 

Published 2021

M&G Coloring Pages

For students of ALL ages: click and print the coloring sheet, then find inspiration in the Old Master’s original to create your own version!  Share your work with others on social media and tag the Museum & Gallery!  

Esther Accusing Haman by Jan Victors, Dutch (1619–after 1676)

For a printable coloring sheet click HERE.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Heavenly Shepherd by Bartolomé Esteban Murillo, Spanish (1617–1682)

For a printable coloring sheet click HERE.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Joseph Sold into Bondage by His Brethren by Giovanni Battista Carlone, Genoese (1603–1684)

For a printable coloring sheet click HERE. 

 

Rest on the Flight to Egypt by Francesco Granacci, Florentine (1469–1543)

For a printable coloring sheet click HERE.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Madonna of the Chair by Unknown (copy of Raphael)

For a printable coloring sheet click HERE

Think On These Things

Due to COVID-19, our regular routines and social interactions have been disrupted. However, in the face of change and the unknown, what our minds dwell on becomes critical. While beauty has always mattered in our lives, perhaps it shows itself all the more valuable and significant in a crisis. Pause to reflect on a few, beautiful images and ideas represented in M&G’s Collection—things worthy of our thinking.

From the Director

Since M&G closed its two museum sites in February 2017, we’ve busily pursued some creative ideas and valuable feedback about the Old Master collection and M&G’s re-opening.  Watch the most recent video to follow our updates and learn about M&G’s focus and next steps in our service to you!

M&G Kids

Everyone, no matter their age, can learn about and enjoy art! These special activities will help children discover the joys of studying art closely and learning from it.

 

Coloring Pages

Esther Accusing Haman by Jan Victors, Dutch (1619–after 1676)

For a printable coloring sheet click HERE.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Heavenly Shepherd by Bartolomé Esteban Murillo, Spanish (1617–1682)

For a printable coloring sheet click HERE.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Picture Books created using paintings from the Museum & Gallery Collection.