Archive for the ‘Division Page: EXPLORE’ Category

Watch This!

Through the years, M&G has developed topical videos to support the educational themes of our diverse exhibitions and outreaches.  Enjoy learning about the people of the past through these varied glimpses.

Why do we collect?
Why do we create?
The Continuing Victorian Narrative: Charles Dickens Social Realism Novels
The Continuing Victorian Narrative: Lightbearers
The Continuing Victorian Narrative: Inspiring Character
The Continuing Victorian Narrative: Theatre of the Mind
The Continuing Victorian Narrative: Caroline Norton & Angela Burdett-Coutts
The Continuing Victorian Narrative: Women
The Continuing Victorian Narrative: Conan Doyle & Henry Irving
The Continuing Victorian Narrative: Gentlemen
Symbols in Religious Art: Representations of Deity
Symbols in Religious Art: Earthly Saints and Heavenly Spirits
Symbols in Religious Art: Attributes of the Martyrs
Symbols in Religious Art: Prominent Bible Characters
Symbols in Religious Art: The Four Apostles
The Life of Martin Luther
Conservation
The Charleston Silver Lady
Frederic James Shields: The Pre-Raphaelites
Why We Collect
Ten Most Forged Artists
Han van Meegeren: part 1
Han van Meegeren: part 2
Han van Meegeren: part 3
Lost Art: The Cassirer Family
Lost Art: The Bendel Family
Lost Art: The Bloch-Bauer Family
Landmark Case of Nazi-Looted Art: The Discovery
Landmark Case of Nazi-Looted Art: Authentication
Landmark Case of Nazi-Looted Art: Verdict
The High Renaissance: Raphael
The High Renaissance: Leonardo da Vinci
The High Renaissance: Michelangelo
Mannerism: An Introduction
Mannerism: Characteristics
Mannerism: Conclusion
Baroque Art: Introduction
Baroque Art: Prominent Schools
Baroque Art: Stylistic Scope
Baroque Art: Conclusion

A Closer Look

Take a closer look at objects in the collection to discover fascinating details in the materials, narrative, or artists. Each clip will help you better understand the past as well as enjoy the objects in M&G’s collection.

Giovanni Antonio Bazzi: Procession to Calvary
Domenico Fiasella: The Flight into Egypt
French Stained Glass: The Fountain of Life
Christ the Redeemer: Paris Bordone
Madonna and Child: Master of the Greenville Tondo
John the Baptist: Polychromed Sculpture
Gaspar de Crayer: St. Augustine & St. Ambrose
Edwin Long: Vashti Refuses the King’s Summons
Louis Comfort Tiffany: Inspiration
Govaert Flinck: Solomon’s Prayer for Wisdom
Simon Vouet: Salome with the Head of John the Baptist
Francesco Granacci: Rest on the Flight into Egypt
Alessandro di Mariano Filipepi, called Sandro Botticelli (and studio): Madonna and Child with an Angel
Jusepe de Ribera: Ecce Homo
Gustave Doré: Christ Leaving the Praetorium
Girolamo Della Robbia: Terracotta Busts
Mattia Preti: Christ Seats the Child in the Midst of the Disciples
Peter Paul Rubens: Christ on the Cross
Cassone: Renaissance Marriage Chest
Francesco de Rosa: The Martyrdom of St. Lawrence
Guido Reni: The Four Evangelists
Geritt van Honthorst: The Holy Family in the Carpenter Shop
Francois de Troy: Christ and the Samaritan Woman
Francesco Cavazzoni: Legend of the Finding of the True Cross
Giovanni Filippo Criscuolo (attr. to): The Last Judgment
Stefano Cernotto (attr. to): The Last Supper
Salvator Rosa: Landscape with the Baptism of Christ
Domenico Zampieri: St. John the Evangelist
Jaun de Flandes: St. Augustine and St.Roch
Jan Hermansz. van Bijlert: Mary Magdalene Turning from the World to Christ
Anthony van Dyck: Mother of Sorrows (Mater Dolorosa)
Jan Swart: Nativity Triptych
Jan Gossaert: The Madonna of the Fireplace
Northern Mannerism: The Martyrdom of Peter
Marietta Robusti: Allegory of Wisdom
Philippe de Champaigne: The Christ of Derision
The Easter Story: Two Centurions
Antonio del Castillo y Saavedra: St. John the Baptist in the Wilderness

History in Pictures

Art is a record of ideas and messages from the past by reflecting its own time and culture. Sometimes art’s culture is foreign to our own experiences and understanding today, which requires a translation in order for us to grasp the meaning of its intent and the significance in its time. Listen and learn about works of art and their context from M&G’s collection and others—it’s an opportunity to view the world beyond your twenty-first-century perspective and experience.

 

Michail Nicholaievich Molodeshin
Pompeo Batoni
William Hamilton, R.A.
Jan Gossaert, called Mabuse (attr. to)
Rembrandt Harmensz. van Rijn (school of)
Louis XVI Musical Mantel Clock
Peter Paul Rubens (follower of)
Jacopo Robusti, called Il Tintoretto
Two Angels with Banner
Domenico Zampieri, called Il Domenichino
Anthony van Dyck
Bartolomé Esteban Murillo
Louis Comfort Tiffany
Benjamin West, P.R.A.
Carlo Francesco Nuvolone
Carlo Dolci
Peter Carl Fabergé
Vasiliy Fedotovich Il’in
Edwin Long, R. A.
Hezekiah Tapestry Series
Master of the Borghese Tondo
John Koch
Bone Casket
Rutilio di Lorenzo Manetti
Richard Houston (engraver)
Salvator Rosa
Pietro Novelli
Johann Friedrich Overbeck
Benjamin West, P. R. A.
Albrecht Dürer
Gaspar de Crayer
Lucas Cranach, the Younger
Frans Francken, the Younger
Visiting Museums
Eyre Crowe
Gustave Doré
Niccolò di Pietro Gerini
Gilbert Stuart
Edward Matthew Ward, R.A.

Object of the Month: August 2021

A Philosopher Holding a Book

Oil on canvas

Giambattista Tiepolo

Venetian, 1696–1770

One of the latest Italian painters represented in the Museum & Gallery Collection is the greatest artist of 18th-century Venice, Giambattista Tiepolo. While Tiepolo achieved most of his fame through breathtakingly airy frescoes on the ceilings of palaces, churches, and villas, he also revived age-old themes from the Bible and antiquity through fresh interpretations. Such is the case with a series of bust-length portraits of bearded old men, begun perhaps as early as the 1740s. These men in oriental garb are widely regarded as a series of ancient philosophers, but no definite case may be made for the group since most lack traditional attributes. Tiepolo was certainly influenced by Rembrandt’s paintings of bearded old men which may also be perceived as simple character studies.

The present painting is the original treatment by Tiepolo that together with others from the series was later copied by his artist sons, Domenico and Lorenzo, in etchings called La Raccolta de Teste (The Collection of Heads). The vigorous brushwork, vibrant colors, elaborate dress, and penetrating gaze of the sitter combine to make M&G’s Philosopher Holding a Book an excellent example of Tiepolo’s lesser-known skills at small-scale work. The etching to the left is made by Giovanni’s son as a copy of his father’s work. These smaller versions usually omit the hands, but the cloak clasp is included.

One of the virtues of art that John Keats extols in his poem “Ode on a Grecian Urn” is the ability of art to ask questions of the viewer. Sometimes these questions are answerable; sometimes they aren’t. But the mystery is what draws viewers to return, allowing them to absorb more of the work as well as more of the mystery.

So, what is it that makes this seemingly straightforward portrait of a man with a book so interesting and intriguing?

  • Size: The work is small, unlike most of Tiepolo’s painting, which adorns ceilings and walls of various significant buildings in Venice and elsewhere. This focused work is part of no grand scheme or storyline. The work is part of a larger collection, also unusual for the artist. While artists often had studios of apprentices, Tiepolo’s own sons copied these works as etchings, collecting them into a published book—a practice which, presumably, expanded the audience of viewers and increased greater demand for similar works. This painting is called a portrait; yet, in one sense it is not, for the emphasis is not on the sitter. This man is not a historical figure who wishes to be known to posterity; he is merely an anonymous model given a role to play as a philosopher with a book.
  • Subject: Is he really a philosopher? Which philosopher is he? In the collection of twenty “heads,” only two have been identified as actual philosophers: Diogenes and Pythagoras. It has been suggested that M&G’s may be Xenophon, a Greek historian and philosopher. It has also been suggested that these “philosophers” are merely studies in physiognomy, a so-called science of identifying the character of a person through an examination of facial structure or attributes such as the set of eyes or wrinkles. Such a science was familiar to Tiepolo whose sketches illustrated a manual on the topic.
  • Details: What or who are on the clasps and brooches so prevalent in the collection? Tiepolo used the motif on the clasps in other works not a part of this collection—Two Men in Oriental Costume (a large wall decoration) and the more elaborate scenes of the Scherzi di Fantasia. The cameo-like ornament adorns the turbans as well as the cloaks. Are they meant to identify the philosophers? Or simply beautiful Oriental embellishments?

All of these questions can be frustrating to art historians and viewers alike. But Keats would propose that they are an indication of good art, something beautiful that attracts further examination, pondering, and appreciation without final satisfaction. Good art pulls us out of ourselves and reminds us, like Horatio, that “there are more things in heaven and earth. . . than are dreamt of in your philosophy.” Doubtless, this philosopher with a book would have agreed.

Karen Rowe Jones, M&G board member

Citation: Print, Portrait of a Man, Plate 6, from the series Raccolta Di Teste I; Giovanni Domenico Tiepolo (Italian, 1727 – 1804); Italy; etching on white laid paper; 1931-67-106-2

 

Published 2021

M&G Coloring Pages

For students of ALL ages: click and print the coloring sheet, then find inspiration in the Old Master’s original to create your own version!  Share your work with others on social media and tag the Museum & Gallery!  

Esther Accusing Haman by Jan Victors, Dutch (1619–after 1676)

For a printable coloring sheet click HERE.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Heavenly Shepherd by Bartolomé Esteban Murillo, Spanish (1617–1682)

For a printable coloring sheet click HERE.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Joseph Sold into Bondage by His Brethren by Giovanni Battista Carlone, Genoese (1603–1684)

For a printable coloring sheet click HERE. 

 

Rest on the Flight to Egypt by Francesco Granacci, Florentine (1469–1543)

For a printable coloring sheet click HERE.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Madonna of the Chair by Unknown (copy of Raphael)

For a printable coloring sheet click HERE

Think On These Things

Due to COVID-19, our regular routines and social interactions have been disrupted. However, in the face of change and the unknown, what our minds dwell on becomes critical. While beauty has always mattered in our lives, perhaps it shows itself all the more valuable and significant in a crisis. Pause to reflect on a few, beautiful images and ideas represented in M&G’s Collection—things worthy of our thinking.

From the Director

Since M&G closed its two museum sites in February 2017, we’ve busily pursued some creative ideas and valuable feedback about the Old Master collection and M&G’s re-opening.  Watch the most recent video to follow our updates and learn about M&G’s focus and next steps in our service to you!

M&G Kids

Everyone, no matter their age, can learn about and enjoy art! These special activities will help children discover the joys of studying art closely and learning from it.

 

Coloring Pages

Esther Accusing Haman by Jan Victors, Dutch (1619–after 1676)

For a printable coloring sheet click HERE.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Heavenly Shepherd by Bartolomé Esteban Murillo, Spanish (1617–1682)

For a printable coloring sheet click HERE.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Picture Books created using paintings from the Museum & Gallery Collection.